Beaglier


The Beaglier is a specifically designed breed which is a cross between a Beagle and a Cavalier King Charles Spaniel. The enactment of a 1990’s crossbreeding program in Australia has resulted in a wonderful dog that has lost some of the awkward scenting and prey drive of the Beagle and has been blessed with an affectionate nature with a calm temperament, energetic but not overly excitable, attentive to its audience, keen to befriend both people and other dogs, making this a popular choice for a family dog.

Quick Facts about the Beaglier

Lifespan of a Beaglier

12 to 14 years

Height of a Beaglier at the Withers

13 to 16 inches or 33 to 40cms

Weight of a Beaglier

18 to 30lbs or 8 to 14kgs

Average Price of a Beaglier

Beagliers have an enormous price range dependant upon the breeding history.

In the USA $600 to $5000 strictly dependant upon breeding lineage.

In Australia $1200 up to $7000 for specific breed lineage.

In the UK prices vary from £1000 to £3000.

What breed type is the Beaglier?

The Beaglier is a Hound

Are Beagliers Hypoallergenic?

No. Beagles are not hypoallergenic.

Temperament of the Beaglier

Beagliers make a great family dog with young or older children as they are very affable, attentive and generally very calm, enjoying an affectionate fuss.

They are very sociable dogs to both humans and other dogs and are usually easy going in their nature, they remain calm even when those around them are excitable which is why they are good for small children.

That easy going calmness and intelligent attentiveness would also make them suitable for seniors provided that the senior is capable of giving them some exercise on a daily basis even if that is simply playing fetch.

They are relatively easy to train because they are attentive, eager to please and intelligent. They love games of fetch with frisbees and balls and the feeling at Top Lap Dogs is that these dogs would be great at agility sports.

These dogs will bond closely with attentive owners making them a suitable lap dog or play time dog, so any Beaglier would make a great family addition.

What does a Beaglier look like?

Cute as a puppy – if ever there was a dog that remained looking like a puppy this is the one.

The Beaglier has a domed high brow with a medium length angular snout to a broad soft nose. The ears are wide, flopping forward with a rounded tip finishing at the jawline which is strong and flat underneath.

The neck is of medium length running into broad shoulders over a flat chest with good fine straight legs to broad feet facing forward.

Whilst the general frame is light the body is actually quite strong and these dogs can feel heavier than they look, the back curves upward slightly, dipping as it nears the tail over a firm waist into powerful hips with a thick tail that sticks out to the rear often with a slight curve.

The hips lead down to muscular rear legs over sturdy lower legs with broad feet with deep pads.

It might be fair to say that the Beaglier looks like a puppy version of the Beagle but in some of the Beagliers you can see the resemblance of a Cavalier, particularly when it comes to the coat.

Colours of the coat are often tri-colour but also come in the Ruby of the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel as well as the mixed colours of both breeds such as Black & Tan, Black Red & White and a variety of other mixes.

In general the coat hair will be slightly longer than the beagle and often has the soft feel of the Cavalier and yet moulting appears to be minimal.

History of the Beaglier

The Beaglier is what is termed as a designer breed, the eventual offspring cross of a Beagle and a Cavalier King Charles Spaniel.

A cross breeding program in Australia during the 1990’s gave rise to this ever increasingly popular breed and is now bred worldwide. Breeders wanted a healthy attentive, energetic yet calm small dog that had a less active scent drive than that of the Beagle.

Conclusion

If you are looking for a great family dog that is calm dependable attentive and fun then this is your dog.

Don’t however be held to ransom over prices, as these dogs become more widespread their prices are becoming ever more variable and unless you need a show dog the $7000 is possibly a bit too much, a good hunt and a little patience will find you a good dog at a decent price.

Recent Posts